Breast Cancer Facts

In the US, 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime.

Most women (about eight out of 10) who get breast cancer do not have a family history of the disease.

The most significant risk factors for breast cancer are being female and aging. About 95% of all breast cancers in the US occur in women 40 and older.

Women who get regularly screened for breast cancer have a 47% lower risk of dying from the disease compared to those who don’t.

Breast cancer deaths have been declining since 1990 thanks to early detection, better screening, increased awareness, and new treatment options. Thanks to new treatments and early detection, the five-year relative survival rate for women with breast cancer is about 90 percent.

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women in the US and the first leading cause of cancer death among women globally.

Every 2 minutes, a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer in the US.

Each year, it’s expected that about 2,670 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer in the US, and about 500 will die.

Research suggests breastfeeding for a year or more slightly reduces overall risk of breast cancer — about a 4.3 percent reduction for every 12 months of breastfeeding. Why? One possible explanation: Breastfeeding often interrupts periods, meaning fewer menstrual cycles and less estrogen exposure. Others suggest that the reduced risk can be credited to structural changes in the breast after lactation and weaning.

Quit smoking to control risk of many diseases, including breast cancer. Younger women who smoke have a higher risk of breast cancer than their nonsmoking peers.

Minimizing alcohol intake may control risk.

 

Each year it is estimated that over 220,000 women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer and more than 40,000 will die.

Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer at a younger age, as well as developing cancer in both breasts.

In the US today, there are more than 3.5 million breast cancer survivors — the largest group of all cancer survivors.

Every minute, somewhere in the world, a woman dies from breast cancer. That’s more than 1,400 women every day.

A man’s lifetime risk of breast cancer is about 1 in 1,000.

Women with dense breasts (more glandular and fibrous tissue and less fatty tissue) on mammograms have a risk of breast cancer that is about 1.5 to 2 times that of women with average breast density.

Women often detect breast cancers themselves, so don’t underestimate the importance of a monthly breast self-exam. By becoming more familiar with your breast tissue and appearance, you will be more likely to notice changes should they occur. 

Exercise is also beneficial to breast cancer survivors. A recent study in Cancer found only a third of survivors meet recommended activity levels.

According to the National Institutes of Health, breast cancer survivors are at an increased risk of osteoporosis. Estrogen has a protective effect on bones, and reduced estrogen levels can trigger bone loss.

Resource: www.cityofhope.org